Humanities

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Humanities2018-08-07T22:52:19+00:00
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Humanities Department

 

 

The humanities are academic disciplines that study human culture, using methods that are primarily analytical, critical, or speculative, and having a significant historical element, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural sciences. The humanities include ancient and modern languages, literature, philosophy, religion, and visual and performing arts such as music and theatre.

 

 

Academic Options

Associate in Arts – DTA Art Major

The associate in arts – direct transfer agreement (DTA) degree is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university. YVC offers a variety of disciplines so that students can select their course load based on their area of interest within this degree.These courses are recommended as guidelines for state transfer. For assistance with course selection, contact the program faculty or the Advising Center.

Student please note: To insure that your degree requirements for graduation have been met, you need to review the degree planning guide with an advisor or counselor.

Degree Requirements

Associates in Arts – DTA Communications

The associate in arts – direct transfer agreement (DTA) degree is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university. YVC offers a variety of disciplines so that students can select their course load based on their area of interest within this degree.These courses are recommended as guidelines for state transfer. For assistance with course selection, contact the program faculty or the Advising Center.

Student please note: To insure that your degree requirements for graduation have been met, you need to review the degree planning guide with an advisor or counselor.

Degree Requirements

Associate in Arts – DTA Art Major

The associate in arts – direct transfer agreement (DTA) degree is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university. YVC offers a variety of disciplines so that students can select their course load based on their area of interest within this degree.These courses are recommended as guidelines for state transfer. For assistance with course selection, contact the program faculty or the Advising Center.

Student please note: To insure that your degree requirements for graduation have been met, you need to review the degree planning guide with an advisor or counselor.

Degree Requirements

Associate in Arts – DTA Modern Language

The associate in arts – direct transfer agreement (DTA) degree is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university. YVC offers a variety of disciplines so that students can select their course load based on their area of interest within this degree.These courses are recommended as guidelines for state transfer. For assistance with course selection, contact the program faculty or the Advising Center.

Student please note: To insure that your degree requirements for graduation have been met, you need to review the degree planning guide with an advisor or counselor.

Degree Requirements

Associate in Arts – DTA Art Major

The associate in arts – direct transfer agreement (DTA) degree is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university. YVC offers a variety of disciplines so that students can select their course load based on their area of interest within this degree.These courses are recommended as guidelines for state transfer. For assistance with course selection, contact the program faculty or the Advising Center.

Student please note: To insure that your degree requirements for graduation have been met, you need to review the degree planning guide with an advisor or counselor.

Degree Requirements

Associate in Arts – DTA Art Major

The associate in arts – direct transfer agreement (DTA) degree is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university. YVC offers a variety of disciplines so that students can select their course load based on their area of interest within this degree.These courses are recommended as guidelines for state transfer. For assistance with course selection, contact the program faculty or the Advising Center.

Student please note: To insure that your degree requirements for graduation have been met, you need to review the degree planning guide with an advisor or counselor.

Degree Requirements

Academic Programs

Today’s methods of communicating information through speaking, print, and electronic media require developing proficiency in the traditional skills of verbal, written, and visual presentations as well as exploring new techniques and new media.

Courses are designed for majors and for all wishing to improve their personal and professional communication skills or to gain personal enhancement. These skills are consistently listed as those thought by employers to be among the most important qualities for hiring and success in advancement and promotion.

Students choosing to pursue a degree in Communications should follow a program leading to the Associate in Arts degree (AADTA) and then transfer to a college or university that offers communications as a major.

Drama

Drama is a two-year program designed for theater majors and non-majors alike. Emphasis is divided between the literature of the theater and production. Three full-length productions are prepared and performed each year.

The program meets the proposed accreditation standards of the American Theater Association. Drama Transfer Program students should follow requirements of the Associate of Arts Degree under faculty advisement.

Offering classic theater performances as well as classes for personal enrichment or a career path is the mission of the Yakima Valley College Drama/Theater Department. Theater reflects life, and whatever the YVC Theater department can do to reflect life is our goal.

Careers

Graduates with a degree in drama find careers in an incredibly wide range of fields. many careers are directly connected to the performing arts, including acting, directing, writing, set design, costume development, lighting and sound coordination, make-up artists or teaching.

Drama majors also find careers in the business aspects of the field. Such jobs as producing events, managing theaters, and advertising and promoting productions are examples of the possibilities.

A few of the many web sites that provide more information about the many aspects of drama are listed below:

Actors, Directors, Producers, Playbill, Backstage, Prop People, Acting Coach, Actor Actress, Agent, Artistic Director, Audio Book Narrators, Box Office/Front of House Casting, Director, Choreographer,Costume Designer, Director, Drama Therapy, Educational Outreach, Film and Television Instructor, Lighting Designer, Make-up Artist, Media Planner, Musical Composer, Musical Director, Negotiator/Mediator, Playwright, Politics, Producer, Production Management, Professor, Public Relations, Sound Designer, Stage Crew, Stage Manager, Stunt Coordinator, Talent Agent, Technical Designer, Theatre Administrator, Voice Overs.

YVC Playmasters

YVC Playmasters produces two or three full-length productions each year. Additionally, Playmasters supports the development and implementation of student-created theatre pieces; provides internship opportunities for qualified students in areas such as directing, playwriting, and stage management; participates in a range of community outreach efforts; and supports the work of visiting theatre artists.

YVC Playmasters is an active member of the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival Northwest Drama Conference and is affiliated with the American Theatre Association.

American Sign Language

The goal of American Sign Language (ASL) courses is to enable the students to interact successfully with native signers and to relate language behavior to real-world situations. The regular academic courses meet on a daily basis.

It is advisable to begin the ASL 101 sequences in the fall quarter and thereby complete a one-year program in ASL in fulfillment of the requirement at many four-year colleges or universities.

English Language Learning (ELL)

The goal of the English Language Learning (ELL)courses is to enable the students to interact successfully with native speakers and to relate language behavior to real-world situations. The regular academic courses meet on a daily basis. It is advisable although not required that the student begin the ELL 90 sequences in the fall quarter and thereby complete a one-year program in ELL.

Spanish

The goal of Spanish courses is to enable students to interact successfully with native speakers and to relate language behavior to real-world situations. The regular academic courses meet on a daily basis. The conversation courses differ from the academic courses primarily in breadth. They are usually taught in the Spanish101 or 201 sequences in the fall quarter and thereby complete a one-year program in Spanish in fulfillment of the requirement at many four-year college universities.

Course Placement

Students may generally be placed in these Spanish courses as outlined by the following: SPAN 101: No Spanish to one year of high school Spanish SPAN 102: Two or more years of high school Spanish SPAN 103: Three or more years of high school Spanish SPAN 201: Four or more years of high school Spanish NOTE: The above Spanish courses are not open to native speakers of Spanish (Heritage Speakers). Courses for native speakers include SPAN 231, 232, & 233 (see Spanish for Heritage Speakers below).

Spanish for Heritage Speakers (SHL)

Spanish for Heritage Learners (SHL) courses (SPAN 231, 232 & 233)are targeted to Spanish Speakers who wish to refine and preserve the Spanish they inherited. The courses offer Spanish-speaking students the opportunity to study Spanish formally in an academic setting, in the same way English-speaking students study English in a college setting.

Course Placement

Students who are raised in a home where Spanish is spoken and who possess receptive (comprehension) and productive (speaking) skills in the language can take these courses. These students may be immigrants with limited literacy due to limited schooling or first- or second-generation heritage speakers who are bilingual in Spanish and English, with limited literacy skills in Spanish. Students may be required to take a placement test given by the instructor to determine their language level. Students may be placed in these SHL courses in no particular order.

Music

The Department of Music provides students with academic courses and performing opportunities in vocal and instrumental music as well as opportunities for private lessons.  The department offers course ranging from Music Appreciation and History of Jazz to Music of the World and History of Rock and Roll.  These courses, along with courses for beginning piano, beginning guitar, and music fundamentals, are designed for students who have an interest in music as non-majors.  Non-majors are also encouraged to participate in the performing ensembles.

Students choosing to pursue a degree in Music should follow a program leading to the Associate in Arts degree (AA-DTA) and then transfer to a college or university that offers Music as a major.

Performing Ensembles

Students are encouraged to participate in one of YVC’s performing ensembles. The award-winning YVC Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Combos have become known throughout the Pacific Northwest region for their quality. The YVC Concert Choir, Community Choir, and Chamber Singers have traveled throughout the state and possess a tradition of artistic quality and breadth of styles.

Careers

  • Primary and secondary music educators, college music educators, private music studio teacher
  • Administrative positions with foundations and educational agencies, church affiliated music positions, studio musician, commercial arranger, composer.
  • Piano accompanist, music business careers in retail, recording and artistic promotion, music research positions at state, regional, and national institutions.
View Music Program Brochure

Philosophy

Philosophy has been divided into several traditional areas: Metaphysics concerns the nature of “reality” and existence; Epistemology explores the nature, source and limits of knowledge; Ethics studies the nature of right and wrong, duty and moral obligation and ; Logic helps us determine the difference between correct and incorrect reasoning.

At Yakima Valley College, our courses focus in helping students develop a number of abilities that promote an understanding of Philosophy; the ability to analyze; the ability to organize, assess and compare claims; the ability to read and listen with care and discernment; and the ability to articulate in both written and oral forms what one thinks and why.

Careers

The vast majority of people with advanced degrees in Philosophy work in the field of education, as teachers, lecturers, and writers.

Philosophy majors also work in many other fields, as well as in academic positions outside teaching. Some of the more common areas in which Philosophy majors work are as follows: business, creative writing, editing, education, film making, illustration, fine art painting, law, technical writing.

Studio Arts and Photography

Art is both a mirror to and a shaper of the individual, society, and culture. Art is a fundamental human experience and behavior that crosses all boundaries. The YVC Department of Visual Arts (DoVA) fosters an awareness of the making of art, the interpretation of art, the development of art across cultures and time, and the relevance of art to daily experience.

Students are exposed to the vocabulary and craft of art through the department’s various classes. Stress is given to the development of technical skills, the communication of concepts, and expression of ideas within traditional and contemporary issues, techniques, and technologies.

The faculty in the Department of Visual Arts are committed to developing the skills and talents of the students in their classes, and to place art within the social arena of the community. All full and part-time faculty are practicing, producing, and exhibiting artists.

Careers

  • Painting, sculpture, ceramics, photography, printmaking, environmental art, architecture, interdisciplinary, arts jeweler.
  • Graphic arts, illustration, fashion illustration, typography, fabric design, clothing design, landscape design, architecture, interior design.
  • Cartooning, web design, animation, primary, secondary, and post-secondary education, adult education, art therapy.
  • Museum studies, gallery owner, arts coordinator, art historian, art appraiser, art criticism, art consultant, courtroom artist.

Annual Exhibit

The Department of Visual Arts prepares and exhibits work from its studio classes each year in the YVC Larson Gallery.
The exhibit runs the last four weeks of Spring Quarter.
All students completing studio classes are encouraged to participate. New work from the art faculty is also included.

Humanities Department Contacts

Department of Visual Arts

Rachel DornArt Instructor
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 170
Phone: 509.574.4844
John BissonetteArt Instructor
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 172
Phone: 509.834.4503
Chris OttenArt Appreciation, Photo Instructor
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 162
Phone: 509.834.4539

Department of Communications

Daniel EricksonSpeech/Communications
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 164
Phone: 509.574.4831
Dave McReynoldsCommunication Studies
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 168
Phone: 509.574.6800 x3188
Tony SchmidtCommunication Studies
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 166
Phone: 509.574.4604
Mark QuinnCommunications Instructor
Grandview Campus
Main Building
Building 51, Room 122
Phone: 509.882.7058

Department of Drama

Alicia BickleyDrama Instructor
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 181
Phone: 509.574.4837
Ray PritchardBasic Stagecraft Drama
Yakima Campus
Kendall Hall
Building 12, Room 125
Phone: 509.834.4554

Department of Modern Language

Melinda ChiprezSpanish Instructor
Grandview Campus
Main Building
Building 56, Room 103
Phone: 509.882.7025
Tracy Croshaw American Sign Language Instructor
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 156
Phone 509.574.4810
Peter Monahan Spanish Instructor
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 160
Phone: 509.574.4814
Luis Bello-ZaralloSpanish Instructor
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 158
Phone: 509.574.4826

Department of Music

Steven SlusherMusic Instructor
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 12, Room 112
Phone: 509.574.4835
Jeff NorwoodMusic Instructor
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 12, Room 119
Phone: 509.574.4836

Department of Philosophy

Jason GoochPhilosophy Instructor
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 167
Phone: 509.574.4933
Richard DavisPhilosophy Instructor
Yakima Campus
Palmer Martin Hall
Building 20, Room 159
Phone: 509.834.4542